Where the Wild Rose Blooms – Lori Wick | A Review

wherethewildrosebloomsWhen Jackie Fontaine moves to a small town in the Colorado Territory in 1873 from Boston, Massachusetts, she’s content to help run her uncle’s store and attend school with her sisters. However, when she meets one of Georgetown’s residents, Clayton Taggart, a nice man who is a few years her senior, she refuses to befriend him like her older sister has and firmly decides that he is a pest. Thus, she avoids him and is not happy with the fact that the rest of her family adores him. Will she find a place in her prideful heart for Clayton?


This is not a light read; to be honest, I actually felt depressed because of how the characters are throughout the first third. I had no idea I even felt that way until a family member asked me if something was wrong, and I had to admit that it was the book I was reading. #thelifeofabookworm 😛

The ending wraps everything up and I was grinning while reading the epilogue, but I have to say that I won’t be reading any of the other three novels that come after Where the Wild Rose Blooms (it’s the first in a saga).

characters:

  • Clayton Taggart
  • Jackie Fontaine
  • Eddie Fontaine
  • Addy Fontaine
  • Morgan Fontaine
  • Milly Taggart
  • Mitch Fontaine

-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~-~

What I Liked:

  • Jackie’s testimony. Yes, she had it rough throughout her teenage years, but the Lord ultimately saves her, and that’s the part that I ended up loving most about Where the Wild Rose Blooms.
  • Clayton’s character. In some ways, his ignorance was agitating, as he couldn’t seem to see the facts that were right in front of him, but I can also appreciate his flawed nature. Guys really can’t tell that a girl loves them until they flat-out say it sometimes, and I think it was nice that Wick made Clayton that way; both realistic, and fictional.
  • The way Wick puts such a strong emphasis on the importance of family. Both the Fontaine and Taggart families are very family-oriented, which I appreciate so much, since the vast majority of other books I’ve read are focused elsewhere.

What I Didn’t Like:

  • The haste in which Jackie’s eldest sister, Eddie, got married to her pen pal, Robert Langley. How in love she was with him after having only spent a few hours in his presence didn’t seem like a relationship Wick would write about, as the other 19th-century love stories I’ve read by her have had more chemistry to them. The readers hardly got to know Robert at all before he’d married Eddie and moved away with her.
  • The sadness that encompassed this book. *chuckles* I’m unsure why I kept reading it, aside from the fact that Wick wrote it, and her books always hook me from the beginning. It’s not like “This is the only book I have to read right now”; my bookshelf is full of both fiction and nonfiction titles I haven’t read all the way through, and yet I insist on visiting the library every week. Haha!
  • Whispers of Moonlight is the second book in the Rocky Mountain Memories series, and while I really liked its main character (Travis Buchannan) in Where the Wild Rose Blooms, I didn’t like the sound of the plot of the second novel. I read the first three or four chapters, and am now returning it to the library.

Do I Recommend It?

Do you…

  • love Christian fiction? YES!! Lori Wick’s novels are all wonderful!
  • love Western fiction? Yes, although this book was, like I said, rather sad. I didn’t even know I could love it so much until I read Wick’s Yellow Rose Trilogy. 🙂
  • love romance? Yes, because Wick’s love stories are some of the best that I’ve ever read.

-~- Maggie


Check this book out:

Amazon

Goodreads

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s